The Truth About Superfoods

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There’s a lot of hype about superfoods right now. We’ve all heard about the “magical” properties that certain foods possess, but with all the misinformation out there, it’s hard to really understand what’s true and what isn’t. Luckily, the American Diabetes Association‘s new cookbook is here to set the record straight.

“Certain foods really do pack more nutrition than others,” Cassandra Verdi, MPH, RD, coauthor of Diabetes Superfoods Cookbook and Meal Planner: Power-Packed Recipes and Meal Plans Designed to Help You Lose Weight and Manage Your Blood Glucose said. “Superfoods do exist, and they can be a helpful tool for people with diabetes and anyone else who wants to enjoy better health.”

“Since nearly half of American adults have diabetes or prediabetes, it’s important that everyone understands which foods are the healthiest,” coauthor Stephanie Dunbar, MPH, RD said. “The most nutrient-dense superfoods can be valuable in helping you feel your best, no matter where you are on your wellness journey.”

For the record, a diabetes superfood is a food rich in nutrients that benefit diabetes management or nutrients that are typically lacking in the American diet. You’ll find plenty of them in Diabetes Superfoods Cookbook and Meal Planner. The cookbook offers reliable information about the superfoods people with diabetes crave. You’ll find over 110 flavor-packed recipes that are simple to prepare and contain at least one diabetes superfood to maximize the nutrient density of your diet. The cookbook contains over 40 days of meal plans that incorporate recipes from the book plus additional diabetes superfoods—all of which meet the ADA’s nutrition guidelines.

Ready to learn which foods really are super good for you? To improve your health and start better managing diabetes or prediabetes, add more of these diabetes superfoods to your meal plan …

3 Superfoods

berries

Photo: Deposit Photos

Berries

“Strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, blueberries, and cranberries are packed with antioxidants, which are cancer-fighting molecules,” Verdi said. “Berries are also a great source of fiber. We like them fresh, but they can be enjoyed frozen (great in smoothies) or in dried form as a tasty snack.”

Citrus Fruits

Oranges, clementines, grapefruit, lemons, and limes are great providers of vitamin C and soluble fiber. The authors recommend packing oranges or clementines as a snack since they travel well. Or add a dash of fresh lime in your water for a bit of flavor. Citrus juices can also be used in all kinds of recipes to add the perfect pop of flavor.

To learn about more superfoods, see the full article in Healthy Aging Magazine’s upcoming Spring issue!

 

“The best time to start making healthier choices is right now,” concludes Verdi. “Start adding more superfoods to your diet today and soon you’ll see the tremendous impact they make on your health and well-being.”

Here is one recipe from the cookbook. See more recipes in the full article to be published in the Spring Issue of Healthy Aging Magazine.

Bruschetta-Stuffed Mushrooms

Bruschetta is a colorful and delicious appetizer for any gathering. For a lower-carb option, try this simple bruschetta stuffed in mushrooms instead of serving on the traditional baguette.

 Makes 7 servings

1 pint grape tomatoes
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 teaspoon dried basil
1/3 cup 2% mozzarella cheese
2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1 (14-oz) pack stuffer (larger) mushrooms
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

Cut tomatoes into quarters. Set aside.

In a skillet, heat olive oil and add garlic. Sauté garlic for about 1 minute. Add tomatoes and continue to sauté for about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in basil and both cheeses.

Remove stems from mushrooms and fill with tomato mixture. Bake in oven for 15 minutes at 350°F. Let cool slightly and drizzle with balsamic vinegar. Serve warm.

Choices/Exchanges
1 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 1/2 Fat
Basic Nutritional Values
Calories 50
Calories from Fat 25
Total Fat 3.0 g
Saturated Fat 1.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 3 mg
Sodium 55 mg
Potassium 270 mg
Total Carbohydrate 4 g
Dietary Fiber 1 g
Sugars 2 g
Protein 4 g
Phosphorus 85 mg

Excerpted from Diabetes Superfoods Cookbook and Meal Planner: Power-Packed Recipes and Meal Plans Designed to Help You Lose Weight and Manage Your Blood Glucose. Published by American Diabetes Association, 2019
About the Authors:
Cassandra Verdi, MPH, RD, is the coauthor of Diabetes Superfoods Cookbook and Meal Planner: Power-Packed Recipes and Meal Plans Designed to Help You Lose Weight and Manage Your Blood Glucose and 21 Things You Need to Know about Diabetes and Nutrition. She is a registered dietitian, writer, and nutrition communications expert skilled in nutrition program planning, content development, and recipe development. She is the former associate director of nutrition at the American Diabetes Association, where she managed and developed many nutrition resources.
Stephanie Dunbar, MPH, RD, is the coauthor of Diabetes Superfoods Cookbook and Meal Planner: Power-Packed Recipes and Meal Plans Designed to Help You Lose Weight and Manage Your Blood Glucose and 21 Things You Need to Know about Diabetes and Nutrition. She is an author and consultant specializing in health education program development. She is the former director of nutrition and medical affairs at the American Diabetes Association and has worked as a nutritionist providing diabetes education to children, teens, and adults with diabetes.

 

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